Tag Archives: exhibition

Urban Photo Village @UrbanPhotoFest – Cartographies

UrbanPhotoFest #UPF17
10-15 November 2017
Urban Photo Village @UrbanPhotoFest – Cartographies is an exhibition in the Urban Photo Village at UrbanPhotoFest, an annual photographic arts festival focusing on cities and urban spaces. The Urban Photo Village showcases the work of established and emerging artists, in eleven venues located within walking distance of each other, in and around Deptford. An area with a strong sense of community and neighbourhood, Deptford it is another example of London’s ever-changing social landscape. In addition, the village — with its intensive programme of workshops and seminars — creates an active space to encourage discussion, participation and creativity, involving local communities, artists, researchers and people interested in contemporary urban life.

UrbanPhotoFest

UrbanPhotoFest will take place from 10-15 November 2017 and the theme is Cartographies. The festival aims to provide an engaging and culturally relevant programme that reflects on visual approaches to contemporary urban life and the image of the city. The programme of events includes the Urban Encounters conference, exhibitions, seminars, workshops, urban walks and portfolio reviews; all of which are overseen by a steering group of lens-media artists and urban researchers. The festival collaborates with a number of international arts and academic institutions, established and emerging artists, urban theorists and researchers. Together their work addresses critical urbanism within its varied and diverse forms, and explores how photography plays an important role in opening up debates about urban change, voice and the condition of the city.

10-15 November 2017
Open daily 12–6pm
Private view: Monday 13 November 2017, 6-9pm

www.urbanphotofest.org
Twitter / Facebook @UrbanPhotoFest
#UPF17


Abolish Trout

abolish-trout-18-20nov2016

19th and 20th November 2016, 10am – 4pm
Preview: Friday 18th November 2016, 6-9pm

Craig Coulthard / Peter Donaldson / David Maclean

Abolish Trout is a group show of new work by three Scottish artists, all living and working in London. Originally graduating together from Edinburgh College of Art in 2002, these three friends present new work consisting of sculpture, ceramics, textiles and painting. Taking its title from a doctored piece of anti-immigrant graffiti; (originally reading ‘Polish Out’) Abolish Trout is an opportunity for the artists to exhibit their similarly subtle, humorous and thoughtful creative interventions to a new audience.

Craig Coulthard (b. Rinteln, West Germany, 1981) lives and works in London. He studied at Edinburgh College of Art, and was a co-founder of The Embassy gallery in Edinburgh in 2003. His work has been exhibited at Atelier Hoherweg Dusseldorf, Ingleby Gallery Edinburgh, Camden Arts Centre London and Collective Edinburgh. Recent shows in include The Drummer & The Drone as part of the Edinburgh Art Festival and Generation:TG on the Travelling Gallery. In 2009 Coulthard was awarded the £460,000 Scottish Commission for Artists’ Taking the Lead, part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. His work, Forest Pitch, completed in 2012, saw the construction of a full-size football pitch in the middle of a spruce forest. He also writes and records music as Randan Discotheque.

Peter Donaldson (b. Edinburgh, 1980) lives and works in London. He studied at Edinburgh College of Art, and the Royal Academy Schools, where he is currently a sculpture tutor. He was recently selected for the East London Painting Prize and the ArtWorks Open. His work has been shown at TAP Southend; the Royal Academy of Arts; Modern Art Oxford; the ICA; Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo; and Museo Civico di Rovereto, Trento, Italy. He was awarded the Deutsche Bank Award for Fine Art in 2010.

David Maclean (b. Perth, 1980) lives and works in London. He studied at Edinburgh College of Art and in 2003 co-founded the Edinburgh gallery The Embassy. He moved to London to study at Chelsea College of Arts where he formed the music group Django Django in 2007. The band have gone on to record two albums, tour internationally, and in 2012 were nominated for the Mercury Music Award. Maclean often directs music videos and designs record sleeves for Django Django. Recently he has recorded an album with Damon Albarn’s Africa Express in Mali and this year worked on KT Tunstall’s latest album ‘Kin’. In 2014 he founded his own record label, Kick and Clap. He has recently collaborated with artists such as Haroon Mirza and George Henry Longly, and has scored music for the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Film Four feature, Slow West.

Free entry
Step-free access

Urban Memories

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3rd – 12th November 2016
Preview: Friday 4th November 2016, 6 – 8pm
Open daily, Monday to Sunday 12-6pm

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Image: David Colm Killeen, 2016, courtesy the artist.

UPA (Urban Photographers Association) Annual Exhibition

The organisers of the 2016 International UrbanPhotoFest (UPF) are delighted to present Urban Memories, the annual collective show of the Urban Photographers Association (UPA).

The exhibition shows the selected work of 14 UPA members responding to the Festival theme of Photography, Memory and Archive. Cities are living archives and rediscovering their visual history is fundamental to the development of urban photographic practices. Nothing is cast in stone and only interpreted as heritage; the past is illusive and uncanny. How do historical photographs visualise and politicise daily life in order to commemorate and generate specific social histories, public memories, landscapes and pictorial archives? Cities are not merely architectural metaphors; they are mobile, evolving entities projecting memories deep into the social life of urban dwellers. In what way can urban photography break down social stereotypes and offer alternative ocular archives of cities? Urban Memories tries to answer these questions through a variety of selected visual projects.

Caroline Knowles, Urban sociologist and Goldsmiths professor, says:
“In their entries to this exhibition the artists raise important questions about how we might think about memory; about how memories manifest themselves in cities and in people’s lives; and about the complex multi-layered relationships memory, cities and people might have with photography. In a mix of found images – whose photographers and their preoccupations must be imagined – and newly created images that dialogue in off-beat ways with people, places and circumstances, the artists in this exhibition show us that multiple truths – not the truth – are in contention in the ways in which we apprehend and remember the individual and collective realities which are significant for us.” (UPV catalogue, p. 5)
Exhibiting artists: Peter Coles, Diego Ferrari, Michael Frank, Gill Golding, Paul Halliday, Tanya Houghton, Rebecca Locke, Bas Losekoot, David Kendall, David Colm Killeen, Luc Pauwels, Galit Seligmann, Gesche Würfel and Kyler Zeleny.

For further information, please visit: 
www.urbanphotofest.org
www.urbanphotographers.org
Facebook
Twitter

Workshops:
UPA portfolio review, Tuesday 8th November 2016, 11.00-13.00

Free entry
Step-free access

Freddie Thomas presents Well Proud

Freddie Thomas presents Well Proud

29th – 30th October 2016
Preview: Friday 28th October 2016, 6-9pm

London being Freddie’s hometown she feels very passionate about it and its ever-evolving changing face. Once a place where everyone could afford to live, it is now a place made for the rich, investing in the rich and kicking out the poor. With house prices rising and rising, people are struggling to live on this little island called London. Once a place where council estates were prominent and communities were generations old, it has now turned into a transient place, people coming and going. The young white middle classes, doing their four years in London and then moving on to affordable places to live. Is this place once built on history and tradition turning into one big airport?

Through the use of banners, textile paintings and script, Freddie discusses London, the fabric of society. With every stitch sewn, with every button sewn on, you can feel her passion hovering behind you like a ghost that will not go away. So immerse yourself in the material, feel its presence because she may not be able to afford to live here anymore but she certainly won’t go away.

Free entry
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Phil Ashcroft: Finissage, Fallout

Phil Ashcroft, Qwazars, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 200cm, work in progress, July 2016. Photo: Tom Horak

Thursday 1st September 2016, 6.30-8.30pm
CANAL, 60 De Beauvoir Crescent, London N1 5SB

A final chance to visit Lewisham Arthouse studio holder Phil Ashcroft’s solo exhibition Fallout at CANAL for the finissage on First Thursday 1st September 2016.

The finissage for Fallout will include new work completed during his live painting sessions at CANAL over the summer plus the launch of Monkphat’s new Obelisk EP (Gamma Proforma) with cover artwork by Phil. Monkphat and Phil Ashcroft have worked together on previous Gamma Proforma releases and he recently painted live alongside Monkphat’s set at MATA at The Social, London. ‘Obelisk’ will be free to download via Gamma Proforma on the night. For more on Monkphat go to soundcloud.com/monkphat

Refreshments will be served.

www.whitechapelgallery.org/first-thursdays/exhibitions/fallout/

http://www.canalprojects.info/

http://www.philashcroft.com/


Interventions

Interventions

31st August – 11th September 2016
Preview: Friday 2nd September 2016, 6-9pm

Frederic Anderson, Andrea Coltman, Daniel Curtis, Antony Dixon, Cara Jean Flynn, Sarah Hawley, Jacquelyn Hodges, Benjamin Martin, Tom Waring

The nine artists in this exhibition explore the idea of interventions within the gallery space. Their individual practices, through a variety of different languages and media, are very diverse, yet the artists search to reveal a dialogue, a connection and thread. The group are interested in the relationships between how their works create a visual discourse and how by placing their works within a common space the interventions of their works create yet another layer and language. These artists are searching for hidden dynamics that create new understandings, correlations and connections.

Frederic Anderson’s drawings inhabit the space between figuration and abstraction, between how we believe things to be and how they actually appear – the space in which, under persistent observation, things begin to fall apart.

Andrea Coltman’s paintings muse over societal issues, she regards herself as a social observer. Andrea paints what she sees, the ordinary and expected. Through crosshatchings of realism and abstraction in her paintings Andrea interrogates empathy, space and place exploring how we communicate and interact.

Daniel Curtis
’ practice is driven by form. Through composition he explores tensions and relationships between found and low status objects. In recent work Curtis has searched out subtle elements of character or history in these objects and uses that to charge his compositions with a peculiar presence.

Antony Dixon explores the inherent qualities of materials and things. He collects and references fragments of human activity by taking imprints, making casts, assembling and re-assembling. Interested in the linguistic interface between materials and things, Antony describes his activity as “archaeological in nature, exploratory yet rooted in history.
Cara Jean Flynn creates prints, video, sculptures and installations using a combination of natural and man-made materials. Flynn’s work focuses on our relationship with the natural world. She is particularly concerned with our control of the natural environment and our perceived dualistic thinking of ourselves, separated and elevated above it.

Sarah Hawley’s collages have the ability to bring order out of chaos as well as integrate various patterns, colours, designs and materials from different origins that together can create a uni ed composition. This mimics a multicultural society, where a diverse group of individuals of many cultures co-exist within a community.

Jacquelyn Hodges’ subject is in painting and sculpture and where they intersect. She works in a range of mediums because her interest is to take her subject and nd new methods of intersection. Jacquelyn assembles materials that may seem like they have nothing to do with each other but looks to nd the tension and overlap.

Identity is the central axis of Benjamin Martin’s practice, around which revolves notions of childhood, gender and the artificial. Benjamin is interested in how the social and political shape us from an early age and in how the landscapes that surround us create both physical and psychological scars. What shapes us?

Tom Waring’s paintings explore an imagined world where the boundaries between the present and future have disappeared. Projections of the now, into the future, create a fertile ground for exploring our present condition in our real world of unrivalled capitalism and ecological decline.

Preview: Friday 2nd September 2016, 6-9pm
Exhibition open:
31st August – 11th September 2016
Wednesday to Sunday 12-6pm

Free entry
Step-free access

Oliver Campbell: Good God

Oliver Campbell, Scene from the Bacchae, 189 x 120cm, 2016

10th – 14th August 2016, 10-6pm
Preview: 9th August 2016, 6-9pm

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Image: Oliver Campbell, Scene from the Bacchae, 189 x 120cm, 2016

Good God is the first solo exhibition by Oliver Campbell (b.1981).

Drawing on tropes from classical literature and rhetoric, this exhibition of paintings and other objects takes seriously the absurdity of some of our most imaginative beliefs, and explores their relation to our everyday experience.

Symposium: Thursday 11th August 2016, 7.30-9pm
In conjunction with the exhibition Good God there will be a full Greek Symposium: an ancient drinking party with entertainment and discussion. There will be wine and a non-alcoholic alternative, entertainment, and three related topics posed for discussion. To reserve your couch please RSVP to: info@lewishamarthouse.org.uk

Artist Talk: Sunday 14th August 2016, 2-3pm

Oliver Campbell in conversation with Dr Brian Murray from Kings College London.

To download exhibition invitation as a pdf click here

Exhibition continues:
10th – 14th August 2016, 10-6pm, or by appointment.

Free entry
Step-free access

How the Hares are Dying: Private Stocktaking

How the Hares are Dying

15th – 17th July 2016
How the Hares are Dying: Private Stocktaking
Work in progress by Ja Ja Ja Ne Ne Ne

The founders and core creative team of Ja Ja Ja Ne Ne Ne are Magdalena Tuka and Anita Wach, two very different performing artists from backgrounds in theatre and dance respectively, who were inspired in 2013 to unite under a name appropriated from the 1968 Joseph Beuys’ artwork to represent the creative combination of opposites.

Through its various mixes of new dramaturgy, contemporary dance, and multimedia experimentation, the work of Ja Ja Ja Ne Ne Ne (JJJNNN) may be located within the notion of a postdramatic theatre. The narrative of a JJJNNN show is never that of a linear cause-and-effect system of events but one open to fragmentation and deconstruction. Fiction is employed as a device for the performer-devisors to confront personal material, though the strategies used to achieve such confrontations are not set in stone but built anew in relation to the content being dealt with. While the initiator of each project may ultimately retain an authorial final word, JJJNNN encourages the idea of a performer’s autonomy and every performance is very much the result of a true collaboration.

From the outset one of the group’s key modus operandi has been the development of co-operations with and support of other international organisations and individual artists. Over the last three years of showing work a network of ongoing connections has evolved throughout Poland and the UK as well as in Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Works presented by JJJNNN have received various funding including Polish Ministry of Culture, Visegrad Foundation, Adam Mickiewicz Institute, Dance Festival in Gdansk 2013; Threecity Dance Cooperation, Body/Mind Foundation, Maat Festival.

‘There were men and women, children and old people, teenagers and babies, rich people, and poor people, black men and white women, white men and black women, Orientals and Arabs, men in brown, and grey and blue and green, women in red and white and yellow and pink, children in sneakers, children in shoes, children in cowboy boots, fat people and thin people, tall people and short people, each one different from all others, each one irreducibly himself…’ City of Glass Paul Auster                                    
How the Hares are Dying: Private Stocktaking is about: war (past, future and now) and identity smeared in the muddy memory’s landscapes, about mnemonic and reaching out to the cellars of that memory to recall girls from grey pre-stressed concrete housing estates, about a sense of destroying everything around and weakness of the will and about the power of drawing by the Great Architect. It’s a combination of different theatre strategies, a stubborn and unstable search for the meaning of the events on stage, giving up and start from the beginning again and again. 

Click here for a link to the teaser

Work is devised and performed by Magdalena Tuka and Anita Wach, sound and video by Myles Stawman. Work combines video, live video, sound and live acts.
jajajanenene.com

Performances:
Friday 15th – 17th July 2016
7-8pm

Free entry
Step-free access

Fracture: Rory Biddulph | Kate Hubbell

Fracture, 2016. Image courtesy the artists

24th June – 1st July 2016
Preview: Friday 24th June 2016, 6-9pm

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Image: Rory Biddulph, A Game of Orbs (detail), acrylic, ink, spray paint and laser print on paper, on board, 122 x 94 x 3cm, 2016. Image courtesy the artist.

Rory Biddulph | Kate Hubbell
Curated by Xenia Langlois

The theme of the exhibition comes from the artists’ combined interest in portraying the effects of social and cultural identification through analogy and absurdity.

Both artists are graduates from the Slade School of Fine Art and have exhibited widely. Rory Biddulph was recently shortlisted for the Adrian Carruthers Award and the Clifford Chance Printmaking Purchase Prize, he was also included in the XL Catlin Art Guide and is a current finalist in the XL Catlin Art Prize. Kate Hubbell has attended numerous residencies including being resident artist at the Atlantic Center for the Arts and the Oxbow School of Art and Artist Residencies. She was also recently shortlisted for the Red Mansion Art Prize and the Sarabande Scholarship.

Rory Biddulph is known for depicting strange, carnivalesque characters using layered print alongside painted imagery. Stemming from a kind of urban gut, Biddulph depicts a crude and elaborate present. In his work iconography, ideology, the spectacle and the social become subject to reproach, plunged into visions of fantasy, metaphor and excess.

Kate Hubbell orchestrates experiences of empathy and connectivity through immersive installations, video and objects. She employs a wide range of materials, including synthetic hair, gelatin, food and makeup to analyse the tensions and anxieties manifested within the dichotomies of comfort and unease.

Xenia Langlois, curator, comments: ‘Fracture is an exhibition in which the taxonomies, ideologies and the habitual infrastructures of contemporary life become subjected to play, depravity, fancy and farce, questioning the role of the self in what is depicted as an arcane, tumultuous time.’

Please see the following websites for more information on the artists and their work.

www.rorybiddulph.com       
www.katiehubbell.com

Exhibition continues:
25th June – 1st July 2016
Open Wednesday to Sunday 12-6pm

Free entry
Step-free access

Chris Alton: the man who moved too far, too fast

Chris Alton, Under The Shade I Flourish, 2016

17th – 22nd May 2016
Open 12-6pm
Preview: Wednesday 18th May 2016, 6-9pm

“1963: An unknown rhythm ‘n’ blues band called Trident* play at various jazz clubs in London and the home counties. The group come under the management of Michael Ashcroft, a business graduate from Mid-Essex Polytechnic, who sees them play at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, Surrey.”

During the mid-1960s, a rhythm ‘n’ blues band called Trident were briefly managed by the non-uk domiciled billionaire, Michael Ashcroft. Ashcroft is a controversial figure, notable for; “opaque tax practices”, “operating in the dark” and his use of “shell companies”. This exhibition imagines that he continued to manage Trident, incorporating feedback from his life into their narrative.

Trident become a vehicle to discuss the exploitation of post-colonial countries as tax havens. Fictitious tours see them zigzag haphazardly between venues, mimicking financial graphs; song lyrics repurpose Latin mottos and tax terminology; and posters advertise performances in notorious centres of tax avoidance (including Belize, where Ashcroft resides).

Chris Alton’s recent exhibitions include; Welcome, Trident; International Stars, THE DOOR (curated by Rice + Toye), London (2016); Under the Shade I Flourish, xero, kline & coma, London (2016); Outdancing Formations, Edith-Russ-Haus, Oldenburg (2015); and each other, Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridgeshire (2015). Alton was recently awarded; the Edith-Russ-Haus Award for Emerging Media Artists of the Sparda Bank 2015; the Lewisham Arthouse Graduate Studio Award 2015; and the Collyer Bristow Graduate Award 2014. He was included in the Catlin Guide 2015.

www.chrisalton.com
www.benford1956.wordpress.com

*Dirty Politics, Dirty Times, Michael Ashcroft, 2005

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Image courtesy the artist, Chris Alton 2016


MOVENZE: London Fragments of a Journey

MOVENZE: "London Fragments of a Journey"

27th April – 15th May 2016
Preview: Friday 29th April 2016, 6-9pm

Maurizio Trentin – Arte Contraddittoria

Movenze: London Fragments of a Journey has its beginnings in the everyday voyage of a London bus. Using a meditative process, frames from this journey have been transformed by the artist into careful reflections that express aspects of the surrounding reality.
 
Informed by interests in perception, gestalt, phenomenology and mathematics Maurizio Trentin describes his vision through twenty fragments in a study of the sensitive.

www.artecontradd.it

Open Wednesday to Sunday 12-6pm
Free entry
Step-free access

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Image: Maurizio Trentin, Arte Contraddittoria, 2016. Image courtesy the artist.


The Garden of Forking Paths

The Garden of Forking Paths
Red Shift Detail 1 2012-14The Garden of Forking Paths

16th – 27th March 2016
Preview: Friday 18th March, 6-9pm

Open Wednesday – Sunday, 12-6pm

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top: Russell Terry, Red Shift, hand cut painted paper, 2012-14, plus a detail, bottom: exhibition invitation card

Curated by Russell Terry

Brigitte Parusel, Caterina Lewis, Cedric Christie, Charley Peters, Italia Rossi, Jack Otway, Lucy Harker, Ludovica Gioscia, Paul Robinson, Roland Hicks, Rowena Boshier, Russell Terry, Ryan Terry, Sarah Longworth-West, Simon Liddiment, Tom Hemming, Trevor Simmons

“Destiny takes pleasure in repetitions, variations, symmetries” – Jorge Luis Borges

This collection of work by seventeen artists, showing diverse and unique methods and interests, is waiting for an infinite tapestry of connections to be woven across it. 

The title of this show is borrowed from Jorge Luis Borges. The Garden of Forking Paths is a beguiling story about an impossible book that is also a labyrinth. Borges was famous for condensing complex, paradoxical ideas into incredibly short fiction, much of it expressing his attraction and/or frustration with the “muse of impossibility”. He considered the composition of huge books “an impoverishing extravagance” and chose instead to maintain the ambiguity and potential perfection of his ideas, by writing commentaries on imaginary books. Even with such a solution, the inevitable failure to realise an idea before it transforms into a new one, keeps us starting afresh. Our ideas occur so much faster than the process of realising them. From the first step out of imaginary space, they have to contend with unforeseen practicalities and suffer the inconvenience of existing unambiguously. By the time we finish/abandon them, influenced by manual discovery, they are rarely the same idea. Looking back over our finished/abandoned works, we often see that each one contains the seeds and reflections of so many others, made and unmade.
 
To download press release click here (pdf)

To download invitation card click here (pdf)

https://www.facebook.com/events/930696066977477/

Free entry
Step-free access

School Of The Damned: End Of Year

School Of The Damned
School Of The DamnedSchool Of The Damned

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Image courtesy School Of The Damned.

Exhibition Dates: 4th – 13th March 2016
Open daily, 12-6pm
Preview: Friday 4th March, 6.30-9pm

ZOE ANSPACH | ROBERT CARTER | MELANIE COLES | MICHAEL CROWE | PENELOPE DIAZ | JACK FISHER |
VICTORIA FORNIELES | ROBERT FUNG | KYLE GALLOWAY | JAKE KENT | KATE MAHONY | PHILLIP REEVES |
ANASTASIA SHIN | REBECCA TOWNROW | MATT WELCH | MITT WHEELDON | ELISE WORTLEY

Class Of 2016 Manifesto:

The School of the Damned is a free postgraduate art course run by, and for, its students. It provides participants with the critical space to develop and reassess their art practice. We operate without money, without a bank account, without financial obligation. SOTD runs a labour exchange programme with a growing number of guest artists, spaces and lecturers. It exists to promote access to free education as a fundamental right and stand in opposition to the current system of higher education. The student body share roles and the responsibility to aid each other’s education as well as the development of the programme. As SOTD moves into its fourth year its students hope that this network of advocates will continue to grow, allowing the protest to continue into the future.

End of Year will host the work of this year’s 17 students, whose energetic and diverse practices have developed from their involvement in SOTD. Over the past year the class of 2016 have exhibited together extensively, End of Year is their final show and a culmination of their work on the course together. This “degree show” style exhibition echoes the institution in a way that demands SOTD is recognised as a working alternative and demonstrates that this collection of artists can work together to run a school, collectively organise exhibitions and programme events that are outward facing and inclusive. As in the above manifesto, this is something Class of 2016 will pass on to a new cohort of students/ artists.

Continuing the School of the Damned ethos, this year’s final degree show will be hosted by Lewisham Art House. Members of Lewisham Art House share their time, equipment and knowledge with wider communities on a non-profit basis. Besides renting space, each studio member commits at least 5 hours per month in support of the organisation’s wider programmes. There will be talk and discussion with SOTD and guests on Saturday 13th March at 7PM speakers to be confirmed check fbook/website for updates all are welcome to attend.

Click here to download Press Release as a pdf

For more information on School Of The Damned please visit:
schoolofthedamned.com or email schoolofthedamned15@gmail.com

Free entry
Step-free access

Alex Tyrrell: Memories We Made in the Computer Age

5th – 16th August 2015

Alex Tyrrell Memories We Made in the Computer Age

Curated by Rebecca Edwards

For his exhibition at Lewisham Arthouse, Alex Tyrrell presents Memories We Made in the Computer Age, a multichannel sound sculpture introducing music from the debut album of the same name.

The work seeks to challenge normative approaches to composition and live performance by presenting the music in the form of an immersive, spacial sound environment, utilising directional speakers and natural acoustic reflections. Emancipated from the concerns of orchestration and harmonic arrangement: Alex’s work problematises the relationship between timbre and space, challenging the listener to explore the physicality of the composition, while homogenising the relationship between sound and materiality.

The installation will also serve as a public launch for the album Memories We Made in the Computer Age, giving listeners the opportunity to experience the work in its intended immersive realisation.

Alex Tyrrell is an artist and composer from London. Recent performances/exhibitions include: 10 Empty Boxes (The Vaults Gallery), Computer Music (Progkunstfestivalen, Oslo) and Improvised Series (The Park Studios, Wembley).

More information: becc.edwards@gmail.com

An Arranged Marriage

15th – 17th May 2015

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Six UAL students exhibit their work together against their will.

Experience a group show, the outcome of an arranged marriage that these artists would definitely like to share with you. Celebrate the result of our collaboration at the beautiful venue that Lewisham Arthouse has provided us. Exhibiting the works of:

Kathryn Armitage
Tom Benedek
Leonel Cravioto
Christina Koutsolioutsou
Sophie Fox
Joe Winder

Poesy

Friday 27th – Sunday 29th March 2015

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“As I lay asleep in Italy
There came a voice from over the sea,
And with great power it forth led me
To walk in visions of poesy”
– The Masque of Anarchy by Percy B Shelley

Poesy is a new collaborative project from visual artists Louise Emily Thomas and Nell Loder. The project, based on the poem The Mask of Anarchy by Percy B Shelley, will culminate in a three-day experimental show at the Lewisham Arthouse. The title Poesy – a Middle English term derived from the Greek poiesis ‘making, poetry’; poiein ‘ to create’, represents the premise of the project; exploring boundaries between poetry, art and the moving image.

In the spirit of protest, folk tradition and the process of ‘making’, the artists will endeavor to create an innovative piece of work that re-imagines Shelley’s historical poem in a new language. Craft techniques from around the world will be used to explore a multitude of processes, resulting in a theatrical multi-media installation in the gallery space. Taking a collaborative approach, the artists will work alongside peers within music, art curation and political theory, to re-narrate the poem from various angles, offering a new interpretation of Shelley’s work for a wider audience.

The poem was written on the occasion of the Peterloo massacre, a fatal protest that voiced the lack of suffrage, amongst other issues. Thomas and Loder are interested in re-appropriating the political, social and romantic agendas present in the literature, to demonstrate the virtues of poetic thought that the poem explicitly advocates. The show will result in the production of a moving image work that will be released and screened in May 2015.

The artists met and trained at The Heatherley School of Fine Art in Figurative Sculpture and now work independently in London. Their individual practices have evolved to push the boundaries of the figurative tradition by focusing on the object as multi-functional within the disciplines of puppetry, animation, performance and theatre.